Category: Resources


I had a psychiatric evaluation in 2008 which diagnosed me with major depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and post traumatic stress disorder. Okay, I accepted the diagnosis, even if I didn’t feel it was all that severe.

Yesterday I met with a second psychiatrist as part of my follow up after being discharged. She confirmed the primary evaluation and prescribed me an antidepressant (Lexapro) to help with the depression and anxiety. I took my first pill yesterday and have felt nauseous since then. I do not know for sure if this is a side effect of the medication, or a delayed reaction to the tylenol pms I took Sunday night. I am hoping it is the Lexapro, and that it will work itself out in the next two weeks. I did put a call into the psychiatrist to make sure that this was anticipated and not something I needed to be seen for.

The official Lexapro website lists the side affects of the drug:

In clinical trials, the most common side effects associated with Lexapro treatment in adults were nausea, insomnia (difficulty sleeping), ejaculation disorder (primarily ejaculation delay), fatigue and drowsiness, increased sweating, decreased libido, and anorgasmia (difficulty achieving orgasm). Side effects in pediatric patients were generally similar to those seen in adults; however, the following additional side effects were commonly reported in pediatric patients: back pain, urinary tract infection, vomiting, and nasal congestion.

These are not all the possible side effects with Lexapro. Please see the Important Risk Information, including boxed warning at the bottom of this page, and the full Prescribing Information.

After meeting with the psychiatrist yesterday, I have better understanding of my mental health issues and feel confident that this new treatment plan will work much better. She made it  clear to me that I cannot work through therapy without being stable and to be stable I need medication. “It’s not an option for you” she said, “some of my patients can choose medication or choose not to take it, but you MUST take it.” So, I’m now officially “medicated” and hoping that this will be effective. I don’t want to be another one of those patients who has to try a dozen different drugs before finding one that works for me. I hate taking pills as it is and am hoping I can remember them.

Because my current counseling office does not provide psychiatric services at a reduced rate, I will be meeting with my therapist to have a closure session and process my transfer of services paperwork. Following that I will have intake processing at the new treatment facility and meet with my psychiatrist, who I met yesterday, for my first counseling session.

My new counselor, Dr. H., is a childhood psychiatrist who generally refers anyone over 18 to one of the male psychiatrists in her office, but because of my history of childhood trauma, she feels that she can help me. If at any point we come to an impasse on her ability to help me, then she will refer me to one of the male psychiatrists in the office who work with adult patients. For now, I feel confident that we are going in the right direction. This way, I can receive my medication and my counseling services at the same place and not have to worry about the demands of transferring charts and updating therapists and such. It will be easier to have all the communication done in the same office and the same agency.

So just wanted to provide an update for those who are following my blog. As always, best wishes on your journey to healing- ss.

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Resources for Survivors

ASCA (Adult Surviving Child Abuse) Australia

ASCA is a national organisation which works to improve the lives of adult survivors of child abuse throughout Australia.

Our long-term strategy is to ensure that all Australian adult survivors of childhood trauma will be able to access the specific services they need, to ensure health, well-being and meaningful engagement in their communities .

ASCA (Adult Survivors of Child Abuse)

Adult Survivors of Child Abuse (ASCA SM) is an international self-help support group program designed specifically for adult survivors of neglect, physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse. The ASCA SM program offers:

  • Community based self-help support groups
  • Provider based self-help support groups
  • Web based self-help support groups
  • Survivor to Thriver workbooks

Domestic Violence Resource
Domestic violence statistics show a steady increase in volient crimes at home. Domestic violence facts are hard to come by as victims maybe scared to come forward or trying to build up some kind of domestic violence defense. This website has been split into sections to help people get the right advice in dealing with the situation and getting domestic violence help

HealthyPlace.com
HealthyPlace.com is the largest consumer mental health site, providing comprehensive, trusted information on psychological disorders and psychiatric medications from both a consumer and expert point of view. We have an active mental health social network for support, online psychological tests, breaking mental health news, mental health videos, our documentary films, a live mental health tv show, unique tools like our “mediminder” and more. We’re glad you found us.

National Domestic Violence Hotline  (NDVH)

NDVH is a nonprofit organization that provides crisis intervention, information and referral to victims of domestic violence, perpetrators, friends and families.

1-800-799-7233

Safe Horizon

Safe Horizon is the nation’s largest provider of services to victims of crime and abuse. Our mission is to provide support, prevent violence, and promote justice for victims, their families and communities.

  • Domestic Violence Hotline: 800.621.HOPE (4673)
  • Crime Victims Hotline: 866.689.HELP (4357)
  • Rape, Sexual Assault & Incest Hotline: 212.227.3000
  • TDD phone number for all hotlines: 866.604.5350

Survivors of Incest Anonymous (SIA)

We are a spiritual, self-help group of women and men, 18 years or older, who are guided by a set of 12 Suggested Steps and 12 Traditions as borrowed from AA, along with some slogans and the Serenity Prayer. There are no dues or fees. Everything that is said here, in the group meeting or member to member, must be held in strict confidence. We do not have any professional therapist working in our group. SIA is not a replacement for therapy or any other professional service when needed. The only requirement for membership is that you are a victim of child sexual abuse, and you want to recover.

United Way First Call For Help

United Way is a worldwide network in 45 countries and territories, including nearly 1,300 local organizations in the U.S. It advances the common good, creating opportunities for a better life for all, by focusing on the three key building blocks of education, income and health. The United Way movement creates long lasting community change by addressing the underlying causes of problems that prevent progress in these areas. LIVE UNITED is a call to action for everyone to become a part of the change.

Women Organized Against Rape (WOAR)

Women Organized Against Rape is a non-profit organization in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania whose mission is to eliminate all forms of sexual violence through specialized treatment services, comprehensive prevention education programs, and advocacy for the rights of victims of sexual assault. We provide free counseling for survivors of rape and childhood sexual abuse. Please explore our website to learn more about sexual violence and the array of services that WOAR can provide to survivors, family members, and the community. 

24 Hour Hotline: 215-985-3333

SVU: 215-685-3251

The Wounded Healer Journal

Hello and welcome to The Wounded Healer Journal. TWHJ is the oldest point of presence on the web for psychotherapists and others who have experienced the devastation of trauma including child abuse. Created and maintained from 1995-2002 by Linda Chapman, TWHJ is now managed by Carol McClure.

TWHJ has both forums and chat rooms for Adult Survivors of Trauma and Abuse. We also have a Resources site that can assist you in finding more information about many of the topics found in the forums.